Phil 6.22.18

7:00 – ASRC MKT

  • Add records to each agent that store a list of source and agent influences at each time sample. It should include the name of the item and the amount of influence. Probably save as an XML file, since it has too many dimensions. The file could then be used to create terms or spreadsheets.
  • Project MERCATOR proposal
  • Meeting with Sy

Phil 6.21.18

7:00 – 4:00 ASRC MKT

  • Add an attractor scalar for agents that’s normally zero. A vector to each agent within the SIH is calculated and scaled by the attractor scalar. That vector is then added to the direction vector to the agent – done
  • Remove the heading influence based on site – done
  • Add a white circle to the center of the agent that is the size of the attraction scalar. Done
  • Add attraction radius slider that is independent of the SIH. -done
  • Add a ‘site trajectory’ to the spreadsheet that will have the site lists (and their percentage?)
  • There is now an opportunity for a poster and a demo at SASO
  • Add stories, lists and maps to implication slides – done
  • Got all my connections set up
  • Successfully converted and deployed cosmos-2
  • Voted!

Phil 6.20.18

7:00 – 9:00 2:00 – 5:00 ASRC MKT

  • Redo doodle for all of August – done
  • Schooling Fish May Offer Insights Into Networked Neurons
    • Iain Couzin is deciphering the rules that govern group behavior. The results might provide a fresh perspective on how networks of neurons work together.
  • City arts and lectures: The New Science Of Psychedelics With Michael Pollan
    • Psychedelics reduce the section of the brain that have to do with the sense of self. Pollan thinks that this also happens with certain types of rhythmic music and in crowd situations. This could be related to stampedes and flocking.
    • LSD May Chip Away at the Brain’s “Sense of Self” Network
      • Brain imaging suggests LSD’s consciousness-altering traits may work by hindering some brain networks and boosting overall connectivity
  • Add an attractor scalar for agents that’s normally zero. A vector to each agent within the SIH is calculated and scaled by the attractor scalar. That vector is then added to the direction vector to the agent – done?
  • Remove the heading influence based on site – done
  • Add a white circle to the center of the agent that is the size of the attraction scalar. Done
  • Add a ‘site trajectory’ to the spreadsheet that will have the site lists (and their percentage?)
  • Worked on A2P white paper with Aaron.
  • Worked on a response to Dr. Li’s response

ASRC IRAD 9:00 – 2:00

  • Mind meld with Bob
    • Revisit Yarn
    • Excel stuff?
    • Connect to AWS using bastion. Look in FoxyProxy how to. I need certs
    • Drop on rabbit to deploy to CI and QA and NESDIS  ONE (production)
    • Don’t want sensitive information in Git. We use sharepoint instead
    • Notes and screenshots in document.

Phil 6.19.18

7:00 – 9:00, 4:00 – 5:00 ASRC MKT

  • Here’s a list of organizations that are mobilizing to help immigrant children separated from their families
  • SASO trip
  • Rebuilt all the binaries, now I need to put them on the thumb drive – done
  • Added knobs to the implications slide. They sit next to the dimension and SIH lines. I realize that my slide deck is becoming a physical version of a memory palace.
  • Continuing Irrational Exuberance, though feeling like I should be reading Axelrod. Bring Evolution of Cooperation on the flight?
  • Naive Diversification Strategies in Defined Contribution Saving Plans
    • There is a worldwide trend toward defined contribution saving plans and growing interest in privatized social security plans. In both environments, individuals are given some responsibility to make their own asset allocation decisions, raising concerns about how well they do at this task. This paper investigates one aspect of the task, namely diversification. We show that many investors have very naive notions about diversification. For example, some investors follow what we call the 1/n strategy: they divide their contributions evenly across the funds offered in the plan. When this strategy (or others only slightly more sophisticated) is used, the assets chosen depend greatly on the make-up of the funds offered in the plan. We find evidence of naive diversification strategies both in experiments using employees at the University of California and the actual behavior of participants in a wide range of savings plans. In particular, we find the proportion of the assets the participants invest in stocks depends strongly on the proportion of stock funds in the plan. The results raise very serious questions about how privatized social security systems should be designed, questions that would be ignored in most economic analyses.
    • This is very much a dimension reduction exercise.
  • A2P maintenance proposal

9:00 – 4:00 ASRC A2P

  • Coming up to speed on the Angular interface
    • Logging into CI and QA
    • Dashboard configurations

Phil 5.31.18

7:00 – ASRC MKT

  • Via BBC Business Daily, found this interesting post on diversity injection through lunch table size:
  • KQED is playing America Abroad – today on russian disinfo ops:
    • Sowing Chaos: Russia’s Disinformation Wars 
      • Revelations of Russian meddling in the 2016 US presidential election were a shock to Americans. But it wasn’t quite as surprising to people in former Soviet states and the EU. For years they’ve been exposed to Russian disinformation and slanted state media; before that Soviet propaganda filtered into the mainstream. We don’t know how effective Russian information warfare was in swaying the US election. But we do know these tactics have roots going back decades and will most likely be used for years to come. This hour, we’ll hear stories of Russian disinformation and attempts to sow chaos in Europe and the United States. We’ll learn how Russia uses its state-run media to give a platform to conspiracy theorists and how it invites viewers to doubt the accuracy of other news outlets. And we’ll look at the evolution of internet trolling from individuals to large troll farms. And — finally — what can be done to counter all this?
  • Some interesting papers on the “Naming Game“, a form of coordination where individuals have to agree on a name for something. This means that there is some kind of dimension reduction involved from all the naming possibilities to the agreed-on name.
    • The Grounded Colour Naming Game
      • Colour naming games are idealised communicative interactions within a population of artificial agents in which a speaker uses a single colour term to draw the attention of a hearer to a particular object in a shared context. Through a series of such games, a colour lexicon can be developed that is sufficiently shared to allow for successful communication, even when the agents start out without any predefined categories. In previous models of colour naming games, the shared context was typically artificially generated from a set of colour stimuli and both agents in the interaction perceive this environment in an identical way. In this paper, we investigate the dynamics of the colour naming game in a robotic setup in which humanoid robots perceive a set of colourful objects from their own perspective. We compare the resulting colour ontologies to those found in human languages and show how these ontologies reflect the environment in which they were developed.
    • Group-size Regulation in Self-Organised Aggregation through the Naming Game
      • In this paper, we study the interaction effect between the naming game and one of the simplest, yet most important collective behaviour studied in swarm robotics: self-organised aggregation. This collective behaviour can be seen as the building blocks for many others, as it is required in order to gather robots, unable to sense their global position, at a single location. Achieving this collective behaviour is particularly challenging, especially in environments without landmarks. Here, we augment a classical aggregation algorithm with a naming game model. Experiments reveal that this combination extends the capabilities of the naming game as well as of aggregation: It allows the emergence of more than one word, and allows aggregation to form a controllable number of groups. These results are very promising in the context of collective exploration, as it allows robots to divide the environment in different portions and at the same time give a name to each portion, which can be used for more advanced subsequent collective behaviours.
  • More Bit by Bit. Could use some worked examples. Also a login so I’m not nagged to buy a book I own.
    • Descriptive and injunctive norms – The transsituational influence of social norms.
      • Three studies examined the behavioral implications of a conceptual distinction between 2 types of social norms: descriptive norms, which specify what is typically done in a given setting, and injunctive norms, which specify what is typically approved in society. Using the social norm against littering, injunctive norm salience procedures were more robust in their behavioral impact across situations than were descriptive norm salience procedures. Focusing Ss on the injunctive norm suppressed littering regardless of whether the environment was clean or littered (Study 1) and regardless of whether the environment in which Ss could litter was the same as or different from that in which the norm was evoked (Studies 2 and 3). The impact of focusing Ss on the descriptive norm was much less general. Conceptual implications for a focus theory of normative conduct are discussed along with practical implications for increasing socially desirable behavior. 
    • Construct validity centers around the match between the data and the theoretical constructs. As discussed in chapter 2, constructs are abstract concepts that social scientists reason about. Unfortunately, these abstract concepts don’t always have clear definitions and measurements.
      • Simulation is a way of implementing theoretical constructs that are measurable and testable.
  • Hyperparameter Optimization with Keras
  • Recognizing images from parts Kaggle winner
  • White paper
  • Storyboard meeting
  • The advanced analytics division(?) needs a modeling and simulation department that builds models that feed ML systems.
  • Meeting with Steve Specht – adding geospatial to white paper

Phil 5.25.18

7:00 – 6:00 ASRC MKT

  • Starting Bit by Bit
  • I realized the hook for the white paper is the military importance of maps. I found A Revolution in Military Cartography?: Europe 1650-1815
    • Military cartography is studied in order to approach the role of information in war. This serves as an opportunity to reconsider the Military Revolution and in particular changes in the eighteenth century. Mapping is approached not only in tactical, operational and strategic terms, but also with reference to the mapping of war for public interest. Shifts in the latter reflect changes in the geography of European conflict.
  • Reconnoitering sketch from Instructions in the duties of cavalry reconnoitring an enemy; marches; outposts; and reconnaissance of a country; for the use of military cavalry. 1876 (pg 83) reconnoitering_sketch
  • rutter is a mariner’s handbook of written sailing directions. Before the advent of nautical charts, rutters were the primary store of geographic information for maritime navigation.
    • It was known as a periplus (“sailing-around” book) in classical antiquity and a portolano (“port book”) to medieval Italian sailors in the Mediterranean Sea. Portuguese navigators of the 16th century called it a roteiro, the French a routier, from which the English word “rutter” is derived. In Dutch, it was called a leeskarte (“reading chart”), in German a Seebuch (“sea book”), and in Spanish a derroterro
    • Example from ancient Greece:
      • From the mouth of the Ister called Psilon to the second mouth is sixty stadia.
      • Thence to the mouth called Calon forty stadia.
      • From Calon to Naracum, which last is the name of the fourth mouth of the Ister, sixty stadia.
      • Hence to the fifth mouth a hundred and twenty stadia.
      • Hence to the city of Istria five hundred stadia.
      • From Istria to the city of Tomea three hundred stadia.
      • From Tomea to the city of Callantra, where there is a port, three hundred stadia
  • Battlespace
  • Cyber-Human Systems (CHS)
    • In a world in which computers and networks are increasingly ubiquitous, computing, information, and computation play a central role in how humans work, learn, live, discover, and communicate. Technology is increasingly embedded throughout society, and is becoming commonplace in almost everything we do. The boundaries between humans and technology are shrinking to the point where socio-technical systems are becoming natural extensions to our human experience – second nature, helping us, caring for us, and enhancing us. As a result, computing technologies and human lives, organizations, and societies are co-evolving, transforming each other in the process. Cyber-Human Systems (CHS) research explores potentially transformative and disruptive ideas, novel theories, and technological innovations in computer and information science that accelerate both the creation and understanding of the complex and increasingly coupled relationships between humans and technology with the broad goal of advancing human capabilities: perceptual and cognitive, physical and virtual, social and societal.
  • Reworked Section 1 to incorporate all this in a single paragraph
  • Long discussion about all of the above with Aaron
  • Worked on getting the CoE together by CoB
  • Do Diffusion Protocols Govern Cascade Growth?
    • Large cascades can develop in online social networks as people share information with one another. Though simple reshare cascades have been studied extensively, the full range of cascading behaviors on social media is much more diverse. Here we study how diffusion protocols, or the social exchanges that enable information transmission, affect cascade growth, analogous to the way communication protocols define how information is transmitted from one point to another. Studying 98 of the largest information cascades on Facebook, we find a wide range of diffusion protocols – from cascading reshares of images, which use a simple protocol of tapping a single button for propagation, to the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge, whose diffusion protocol involved individuals creating and posting a video, and then nominating specific others to do the same. We find recurring classes of diffusion protocols, and identify two key counterbalancing factors in the construction of these protocols, with implications for a cascade’s growth: the effort required to participate in the cascade, and the social cost of staying on the sidelines. Protocols requiring greater individual effort slow down a cascade’s propagation, while those imposing a greater social cost of not participating increase the cascade’s adoption likelihood. The predictability of transmission also varies with protocol. But regardless of mechanism, the cascades in our analysis all have a similar reproduction number ( 1.8), meaning that lower rates of exposure can be offset with higher per-exposure rates of adoption. Last, we show how a cascade’s structure can not only differentiate these protocols, but also be modeled through branching processes. Together, these findings provide a framework for understanding how a wide variety of information cascades can achieve substantial adoption across a network.
  • Continuing with creating the Simplest LSTM ever
    • All work and no play makes jack a dull boy indexes alphabetically as : AllWork

Phil 5.22.18

8:00 – 5:00 ASRC MKT

  • EAMS meeting
    • Rational
    • Sensitivity knn. Marching cubes, or write into space. Pos lat/lon altitude speed lat lon (4 dimensions)
    • Do they have flight path?
    • Memory
    • Retraining (batch)
    • inference real time
    • How will time be used
    • Much discussion of simulation
  • End-to-end Machine Learning with Tensorflow on GCP
    • In this workshop, we walk through the process of building a complete machine learning pipeline covering ingest, exploration, training, evaluation, deployment, and prediction. Along the way, we will discuss how to explore and split large data sets correctly using BigQuery and Cloud Datalab. The machine learning model in TensorFlow will be developed on a small sample locally. The preprocessing operations will be implemented in Cloud Dataflow, so that the same preprocessing can be applied in streaming mode as well. The training of the model will then be distributed and scaled out on Cloud ML Engine. The trained model will be deployed as a microservice and predictions invoked from a web application. This lab consists of 7 parts and will take you about 3 hours. It goes along with this slide deck
    • Slides
    • Codelab
  • Added in JuryRoom Text rough. Next is Research Browser
  • Worked with Aaron on LSTM some more. More ndarray slicing experience:
    import numpy as np
    dimension = 3
    size = 10
    dataset1 = np.ndarray(shape=(size, dimension))
    dataset2 = np.ndarray(shape=(size, dimension))
    for x in range(size):
        for y in range(dimension):
            val = (y+1) * 10 + x +1
            dataset1[x,y] = val
            val = (y+1) * 100 + x +1
            dataset2[x,y] = val
    
    
    dataset1[:, 0:1] = dataset2[:, -1:]
    print(dataset1)
    print(dataset2)
  • Results in:
    [[301.  21.  31.]
     [302.  22.  32.]
     [303.  23.  33.]
     [304.  24.  34.]
     [305.  25.  35.]
     [306.  26.  36.]
     [307.  27.  37.]
     [308.  28.  38.]
     [309.  29.  39.]
     [310.  30.  40.]]
    [[101. 201. 301.]
     [102. 202. 302.]
     [103. 203. 303.]
     [104. 204. 304.]
     [105. 205. 305.]
     [106. 206. 306.]
     [107. 207. 307.]
     [108. 208. 308.]
     [109. 209. 309.]
     [110. 210. 310.]]

     

Phil 5.18.18

7:00 – 4:00 ASRC MKT

Phil 5.17.18

7:00 – 4:00 ASRC MKT

  • How artificial intelligence is changing science – This page contains pointers to a bunch of interesting projects:
  • Multi-view Discriminative Learning via Joint Non-negative Matrix Factorization
    • Multi-view learning attempts to generate a classifier with a better performance by exploiting relationship among multiple views. Existing approaches often focus on learning the consistency and/or complementarity among different views. However, not all consistent or complementary information is useful for learning, instead, only class-specific discriminative information is essential. In this paper, we propose a new robust multi-view learning algorithm, called DICS, by exploring the Discriminative and non-discriminative Information existing in Common and view-Specific parts among different views via joint non-negative matrix factorization. The basic idea is to learn a latent common subspace and view-specific subspaces, and more importantly, discriminative and non-discriminative information from all subspaces are further extracted to support a better classification. Empirical extensive experiments on seven real-world data sets have demonstrated the effectiveness of DICS, and show its superiority over many state-of-the-art algorithms.
  • Add Nomadic, Flocking, and Stampede to terms. And a bunch more
  • Slides
  • Embedding navigation
    • Extend SmartShape to SourceShape. It should be a stripped down version of FlockingShape
    • Extend BaseCA to SourceCA, again, it should be a stripped down version of FlockingBeliefCA
    • Add a sourceShapeList for FlockingAgentManager that then passes that to the FlockingShapes
  • And it’s working! Well, drawing. Next is the interactions: Influence
  • Finally went and joined the IEEE

Phil 5.16.18

7:00 – 3:30 ASRC MKT

  • My home box has become very slow. 41 seconds to do a full recompile of GPM, while it takes 3 sec on a nearly identical machine at work. This may help?
  • Working on terms
  • Working on slides
  • Attending talk on Big Data, Security and Privacy – 11 am to 12 pm at ITE 459
    • Bhavani Thiraisingham
    • Big data management and analytics emphasizing GANs  and deep learning<- the new hotness
      • How do you detect attacks?
      • UMBC has real time analytics in cyber? IOCRC
    • Example systems
      • Cloud centric assured information sharing
    • Research challenges:
      • dynamically adapting and evolving policies to maintain privacy under a changing environment
      • Deep learning to detect attacks tat were previously not detectable
      • GANs or attacker and defender?
      • Scaleabe is a big problem, e.g. policies within Hadoop operatinos
      • How much information is being lost by not sharing data?
      • Fine grained access control with Hive RDF?
      • Distributed Search over Encrypted Big Data
    • Data Security & Privacy
      • Honypatching – Kevin xxx on software deception
      • Novel Class detection – novel class embodied in novel malware. There are malware repositories?
    • Lifecycle for IoT
    • Trustworthy analytics
      • Intel SGX
      • Adversarial SVM
      • This resembles hyperparameter tuning. What is the gradient that’s being descended?
      • Binary retrofitting. Some kind of binary man-in-the-middle?
      • Two body problem cybersecurity
    • Question –
      • discuss how a system might recognize an individual from session to session while being unable to identify the individual
      • What about multiple combinatorial attacks
      • What about generating credible false information to attackers, that also has steganographic components for identifying the attacker?
  • I had managed to not commit the embedding xml and the programs that made them, so first I had to install gensim and lxml at home. After that it’s pretty straightforward to recompute with what I currently have.
  • Moving ARFF and XLSX output to the menu choices. – done
  • Get started on rendering
    • Got the data read in and rendering, but it’s very brute force:
      if(getCurrentEmbeddings().loadSuccess){
          double posScalar = ResizableCanvas.DEFAULT_SCALAR/2.0;
          List<WordEmbedding> weList = currentEmbeddings.getEmbeddings();
          for (WordEmbedding we : weList){
              double size = 10.0 * we.getCount();
              SmartShape ss = new SmartShape(we.getEntry(), Color.WHITE, Color.BLACK);
              ss.setPos(we.getCoordinate(0)*posScalar, we.getCoordinate(1)*posScalar);
              ss.setSize(size, size);
              ss.setAngle(0);
              ss.setType(SmartShape.SHAPE_TYPE.OVAL);
              canvas.addShape(ss);
          }
      }

      It took a while to remember how shapes and agents work together. Next steps:

      • Extend SmartShape to SourceShape. It should be a stripped down version of FlockingShape
      • Extend BaseCA to SourceCA, again, it should be a stripped down version of FlockingBeliefCA
      • Add a sourceShapeList for FlockingAgentManager that then passes that to the FlockingShapes

Phil 5.15.18

7:00 – 4:00 ASRC MKT

Phil 5.14.18

7:00 – 3:00 ASRC MKT

    • Working on Zurich Travel. Ricardo is getting tix, and I got a response back from the conference on an extended stay
    • Continue with slides
    • See if there is a binary embedding reader in Java? Nope. Maybe in ml4j, but it’s easier to just write out the file in the format that I want
    • Done with the writer: Vim
  • Fika
  • Finished Simulacra and Simulation. So very, very French. From my perspective, there are so many different lines of thought coming out of the work that I can’t nail down anything definitive.
  • Started The Evolution of Cooperation

Phil 5.8.18

7:00 – 5:00 ASRC MKT

5:00 – 8:00 ASRC Tech Conference

Phil 5.7.18

7:00 – 5:00 ASRC MKT

  • Content Sharing within the Alternative Media Echo-System: The Case of the White Helmets
    • Kate Starbird
    • In June 2017 our lab began a research project looking at online conversations about the Syria Civil Defence (aka the “White Helmets”). Over the last 8–9 months, we have spent hundreds of hours conducting analysis on the tweets, accounts, articles, and websites involved in that discourse. Our first peer-reviewed paper was recently accepted to an upcoming conference (ICWSM-18). That paper focuses on a small piece of the structure and dynamics of this conversation, specifically looking at content sharing across websites. Here, I describe that research and highlight a few of the findings.
  • Matt Salganik on Open Review
  • Spent a lot of time getting each work to draw differently in the scatterplot. That took some digging into the gensim API to get vectors from the corpora. I then tried to plot the list of arrays, but matplotlib only likes ndarrays (apparently?). I’m now working on placing the words from each text into their own ndarray.
  • Also added a filter for short stop words and switched to a hash map for words to avoid redundant points in the plot.
  • Fika
    • Bryce Peake
    • ICA has a computational methods study area. How media lows through different spaces, etc. Python and [R]
    • Anne Balsamo – designing culture
    • what about language as an anti-colonial interaction
    • Human social scraping of data. There can be emergent themes that become important.
    • The ability of the user to delete all primary, secondary and tertiary data.
    • The third eye project (chyron crawls)