Phil 5.31.18

7:00 – ASRC MKT

  • Via BBC Business Daily, found this interesting post on diversity injection through lunch table size:
  • KQED is playing America Abroad – today on russian disinfo ops:
    • Sowing Chaos: Russia’s Disinformation Wars 
      • Revelations of Russian meddling in the 2016 US presidential election were a shock to Americans. But it wasn’t quite as surprising to people in former Soviet states and the EU. For years they’ve been exposed to Russian disinformation and slanted state media; before that Soviet propaganda filtered into the mainstream. We don’t know how effective Russian information warfare was in swaying the US election. But we do know these tactics have roots going back decades and will most likely be used for years to come. This hour, we’ll hear stories of Russian disinformation and attempts to sow chaos in Europe and the United States. We’ll learn how Russia uses its state-run media to give a platform to conspiracy theorists and how it invites viewers to doubt the accuracy of other news outlets. And we’ll look at the evolution of internet trolling from individuals to large troll farms. And — finally — what can be done to counter all this?
  • Some interesting papers on the “Naming Game“, a form of coordination where individuals have to agree on a name for something. This means that there is some kind of dimension reduction involved from all the naming possibilities to the agreed-on name.
    • The Grounded Colour Naming Game
      • Colour naming games are idealised communicative interactions within a population of artificial agents in which a speaker uses a single colour term to draw the attention of a hearer to a particular object in a shared context. Through a series of such games, a colour lexicon can be developed that is sufficiently shared to allow for successful communication, even when the agents start out without any predefined categories. In previous models of colour naming games, the shared context was typically artificially generated from a set of colour stimuli and both agents in the interaction perceive this environment in an identical way. In this paper, we investigate the dynamics of the colour naming game in a robotic setup in which humanoid robots perceive a set of colourful objects from their own perspective. We compare the resulting colour ontologies to those found in human languages and show how these ontologies reflect the environment in which they were developed.
    • Group-size Regulation in Self-Organised Aggregation through the Naming Game
      • In this paper, we study the interaction effect between the naming game and one of the simplest, yet most important collective behaviour studied in swarm robotics: self-organised aggregation. This collective behaviour can be seen as the building blocks for many others, as it is required in order to gather robots, unable to sense their global position, at a single location. Achieving this collective behaviour is particularly challenging, especially in environments without landmarks. Here, we augment a classical aggregation algorithm with a naming game model. Experiments reveal that this combination extends the capabilities of the naming game as well as of aggregation: It allows the emergence of more than one word, and allows aggregation to form a controllable number of groups. These results are very promising in the context of collective exploration, as it allows robots to divide the environment in different portions and at the same time give a name to each portion, which can be used for more advanced subsequent collective behaviours.
  • More Bit by Bit. Could use some worked examples. Also a login so I’m not nagged to buy a book I own.
    • Descriptive and injunctive norms – The transsituational influence of social norms.
      • Three studies examined the behavioral implications of a conceptual distinction between 2 types of social norms: descriptive norms, which specify what is typically done in a given setting, and injunctive norms, which specify what is typically approved in society. Using the social norm against littering, injunctive norm salience procedures were more robust in their behavioral impact across situations than were descriptive norm salience procedures. Focusing Ss on the injunctive norm suppressed littering regardless of whether the environment was clean or littered (Study 1) and regardless of whether the environment in which Ss could litter was the same as or different from that in which the norm was evoked (Studies 2 and 3). The impact of focusing Ss on the descriptive norm was much less general. Conceptual implications for a focus theory of normative conduct are discussed along with practical implications for increasing socially desirable behavior. 
    • Construct validity centers around the match between the data and the theoretical constructs. As discussed in chapter 2, constructs are abstract concepts that social scientists reason about. Unfortunately, these abstract concepts don’t always have clear definitions and measurements.
      • Simulation is a way of implementing theoretical constructs that are measurable and testable.
  • Hyperparameter Optimization with Keras
  • Recognizing images from parts Kaggle winner
  • White paper
  • Storyboard meeting
  • The advanced analytics division(?) needs a modeling and simulation department that builds models that feed ML systems.
  • Meeting with Steve Specht – adding geospatial to white paper

Phil 5.25.18

7:00 – 6:00 ASRC MKT

  • Starting Bit by Bit
  • I realized the hook for the white paper is the military importance of maps. I found A Revolution in Military Cartography?: Europe 1650-1815
    • Military cartography is studied in order to approach the role of information in war. This serves as an opportunity to reconsider the Military Revolution and in particular changes in the eighteenth century. Mapping is approached not only in tactical, operational and strategic terms, but also with reference to the mapping of war for public interest. Shifts in the latter reflect changes in the geography of European conflict.
  • Reconnoitering sketch from Instructions in the duties of cavalry reconnoitring an enemy; marches; outposts; and reconnaissance of a country; for the use of military cavalry. 1876 (pg 83) reconnoitering_sketch
  • rutter is a mariner’s handbook of written sailing directions. Before the advent of nautical charts, rutters were the primary store of geographic information for maritime navigation.
    • It was known as a periplus (“sailing-around” book) in classical antiquity and a portolano (“port book”) to medieval Italian sailors in the Mediterranean Sea. Portuguese navigators of the 16th century called it a roteiro, the French a routier, from which the English word “rutter” is derived. In Dutch, it was called a leeskarte (“reading chart”), in German a Seebuch (“sea book”), and in Spanish a derroterro
    • Example from ancient Greece:
      • From the mouth of the Ister called Psilon to the second mouth is sixty stadia.
      • Thence to the mouth called Calon forty stadia.
      • From Calon to Naracum, which last is the name of the fourth mouth of the Ister, sixty stadia.
      • Hence to the fifth mouth a hundred and twenty stadia.
      • Hence to the city of Istria five hundred stadia.
      • From Istria to the city of Tomea three hundred stadia.
      • From Tomea to the city of Callantra, where there is a port, three hundred stadia
  • Battlespace
  • Cyber-Human Systems (CHS)
    • In a world in which computers and networks are increasingly ubiquitous, computing, information, and computation play a central role in how humans work, learn, live, discover, and communicate. Technology is increasingly embedded throughout society, and is becoming commonplace in almost everything we do. The boundaries between humans and technology are shrinking to the point where socio-technical systems are becoming natural extensions to our human experience – second nature, helping us, caring for us, and enhancing us. As a result, computing technologies and human lives, organizations, and societies are co-evolving, transforming each other in the process. Cyber-Human Systems (CHS) research explores potentially transformative and disruptive ideas, novel theories, and technological innovations in computer and information science that accelerate both the creation and understanding of the complex and increasingly coupled relationships between humans and technology with the broad goal of advancing human capabilities: perceptual and cognitive, physical and virtual, social and societal.
  • Reworked Section 1 to incorporate all this in a single paragraph
  • Long discussion about all of the above with Aaron
  • Worked on getting the CoE together by CoB
  • Do Diffusion Protocols Govern Cascade Growth?
    • Large cascades can develop in online social networks as people share information with one another. Though simple reshare cascades have been studied extensively, the full range of cascading behaviors on social media is much more diverse. Here we study how diffusion protocols, or the social exchanges that enable information transmission, affect cascade growth, analogous to the way communication protocols define how information is transmitted from one point to another. Studying 98 of the largest information cascades on Facebook, we find a wide range of diffusion protocols – from cascading reshares of images, which use a simple protocol of tapping a single button for propagation, to the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge, whose diffusion protocol involved individuals creating and posting a video, and then nominating specific others to do the same. We find recurring classes of diffusion protocols, and identify two key counterbalancing factors in the construction of these protocols, with implications for a cascade’s growth: the effort required to participate in the cascade, and the social cost of staying on the sidelines. Protocols requiring greater individual effort slow down a cascade’s propagation, while those imposing a greater social cost of not participating increase the cascade’s adoption likelihood. The predictability of transmission also varies with protocol. But regardless of mechanism, the cascades in our analysis all have a similar reproduction number ( 1.8), meaning that lower rates of exposure can be offset with higher per-exposure rates of adoption. Last, we show how a cascade’s structure can not only differentiate these protocols, but also be modeled through branching processes. Together, these findings provide a framework for understanding how a wide variety of information cascades can achieve substantial adoption across a network.
  • Continuing with creating the Simplest LSTM ever
    • All work and no play makes jack a dull boy indexes alphabetically as : AllWork

Phil 5.22.18

8:00 – 5:00 ASRC MKT

  • EAMS meeting
    • Rational
    • Sensitivity knn. Marching cubes, or write into space. Pos lat/lon altitude speed lat lon (4 dimensions)
    • Do they have flight path?
    • Memory
    • Retraining (batch)
    • inference real time
    • How will time be used
    • Much discussion of simulation
  • End-to-end Machine Learning with Tensorflow on GCP
    • In this workshop, we walk through the process of building a complete machine learning pipeline covering ingest, exploration, training, evaluation, deployment, and prediction. Along the way, we will discuss how to explore and split large data sets correctly using BigQuery and Cloud Datalab. The machine learning model in TensorFlow will be developed on a small sample locally. The preprocessing operations will be implemented in Cloud Dataflow, so that the same preprocessing can be applied in streaming mode as well. The training of the model will then be distributed and scaled out on Cloud ML Engine. The trained model will be deployed as a microservice and predictions invoked from a web application. This lab consists of 7 parts and will take you about 3 hours. It goes along with this slide deck
    • Slides
    • Codelab
  • Added in JuryRoom Text rough. Next is Research Browser
  • Worked with Aaron on LSTM some more. More ndarray slicing experience:
    import numpy as np
    dimension = 3
    size = 10
    dataset1 = np.ndarray(shape=(size, dimension))
    dataset2 = np.ndarray(shape=(size, dimension))
    for x in range(size):
        for y in range(dimension):
            val = (y+1) * 10 + x +1
            dataset1[x,y] = val
            val = (y+1) * 100 + x +1
            dataset2[x,y] = val
    
    
    dataset1[:, 0:1] = dataset2[:, -1:]
    print(dataset1)
    print(dataset2)
  • Results in:
    [[301.  21.  31.]
     [302.  22.  32.]
     [303.  23.  33.]
     [304.  24.  34.]
     [305.  25.  35.]
     [306.  26.  36.]
     [307.  27.  37.]
     [308.  28.  38.]
     [309.  29.  39.]
     [310.  30.  40.]]
    [[101. 201. 301.]
     [102. 202. 302.]
     [103. 203. 303.]
     [104. 204. 304.]
     [105. 205. 305.]
     [106. 206. 306.]
     [107. 207. 307.]
     [108. 208. 308.]
     [109. 209. 309.]
     [110. 210. 310.]]

     

Phil 5.7.18

7:00 – 5:00 ASRC MKT

  • Content Sharing within the Alternative Media Echo-System: The Case of the White Helmets
    • Kate Starbird
    • In June 2017 our lab began a research project looking at online conversations about the Syria Civil Defence (aka the “White Helmets”). Over the last 8–9 months, we have spent hundreds of hours conducting analysis on the tweets, accounts, articles, and websites involved in that discourse. Our first peer-reviewed paper was recently accepted to an upcoming conference (ICWSM-18). That paper focuses on a small piece of the structure and dynamics of this conversation, specifically looking at content sharing across websites. Here, I describe that research and highlight a few of the findings.
  • Matt Salganik on Open Review
  • Spent a lot of time getting each work to draw differently in the scatterplot. That took some digging into the gensim API to get vectors from the corpora. I then tried to plot the list of arrays, but matplotlib only likes ndarrays (apparently?). I’m now working on placing the words from each text into their own ndarray.
  • Also added a filter for short stop words and switched to a hash map for words to avoid redundant points in the plot.
  • Fika
    • Bryce Peake
    • ICA has a computational methods study area. How media lows through different spaces, etc. Python and [R]
    • Anne Balsamo – designing culture
    • what about language as an anti-colonial interaction
    • Human social scraping of data. There can be emergent themes that become important.
    • The ability of the user to delete all primary, secondary and tertiary data.
    • The third eye project (chyron crawls)

Phil 5.6.18

Sentiment detection with Keras, word embeddings and LSTM deep learning networks

  • Read this blog post to get an overview over SaaS and open source options for sentiment detection. Learn an easy and accurate method relying on word embeddings with LSTMs that allows you to do state of the art sentiment analysis with deep learning in Keras.

Which research results will generalize?

  • One approach to AI research is to work directly on applications that matter — say, trying to improve production systems for speech recognition or medical imaging. But most research, even in applied fields like computer vision, is done on highly simplified proxies for the real world. Progress on object recognition benchmarks — from toy-ish ones like MNISTNORB, and Caltech101, to complex and challenging ones like ImageNet and Pascal VOC — isn’t valuable in its own right, but only insofar as it yields insights that help us design better systems for real applications.

Revisiting terms:

  • Belief Space – A subset of information space that is associated with opinions. For example, there is little debate about what a table is, but the shape of the table has often been a source of serious diplomatic contention
  • Medium – the technology that mediates the communication that coordinates the group. There are properties that seem to matter:
    • Reach – How many individuals are connected directly. Evolutionarily we may be best suited to 7 +/- 2
    • Directionality – connections can be one way (broadcast) or two way (face to face)
    • Transparency – How ‘visible’ is the individual on the other side of the communication? There are immediate perception and historical interaction aspects.
    • Friction – How difficult is it to use the medium? For example in physical space, it is trivial to interact with someone nearby, but becomes progressively difficult with distance. Broadcasting makes it trivial for a small number of people to reach large numbers, but not the reverse. Computer mediated designs typically try to reduce the friction of interaction.
  • Dimension Reduction – The process by which groups decide where to coordinate. The lower the dimensions, the easier (less calculation) it takes to act together
  • State – a multidimensional measure of current belief and interest
  • Orientation – A vector constructed of two measures of state. Used to determine alignment with others
  • Velocity – The amount of change in state over time
  • Diversity Injection – The addition of random, factual information to the Information Retrieval Interfaces (IRIs) using mechanisms currently used to deliver advertising. This differs from Serendipity Injection, which attempts to find stochastically relevant information for an individual’s implicit information needs.
    • Level 1: population targeted –  Based on Public Service Announcements (PSAs), information presentation should range from simple, potentially gamified presentations to deep exploration with citations. The same random information is presented by the IRIs to the using population at the same time similarly to the Google Doodle.
    • Level 2: group targeted – based on detecting a group’s behaviors. For example, a stampeding group may require information that is more focussed on pointing at where flocking activity is occuring.
    • Level 3: individual targeted –  Depending on where in the belief space the individual is, there may be different reactions. In a sparsely traveled space, information that lies in the general direction of travel might be a form of useful serendipity. Conversely, when on a path that often leads to violent radicalization, information associated with disrupting the progression of other individuals with similar vectors could be applied.
  • Map – a type of diagram that supports the plotting of trajectories. In this work, maps of belief space are constructed based on the dimension reduction used by humans in discussion. These maps are assumed to be dynamic over time and may consists of many interrelated, though not necessarily congruent, layers.
  • Herding – Deliberate creation of stampede conditions in groups. Can be an internal process to consolidate a group, or an external, adversarial process.

Trump as Enron (Twitter)

Phil 4.30.18

7:00 – 4:30 ASRC MKT

  • Some new papers from ICLR 2018
  • Need to write up a quick post for communicating between Angular and a (PHP) server, with an optional IntelliJ configuration section
  • JuryRoom this morning and then GANs + Agents this afternoon?
  • Next steps for JuryRoom
    • Start up the AngularPro course
    • Set up PHP access to DB, returning JSON objects
  • Starting Agent/GAN project
    • Need to set up an ACM paper to start dumping things into – done.
    • Looking for a good source for Jack London. Gutenberg looks nice, but there is a no-scraping rule, so I guess, we’ll do this by hand…
    • We will need to check for redundant short stories
    • We will need to strip the front and back matter that pertains to project Gutenburg
      • *** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK BROWN WOLF AND OTHER JACK ***
      • *** END OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK BROWN WOLF AND OTHER JACK ***
  • Fika: Accessibility at the Intersection of Users and Data
    • Nice talk and followup discussion with Dr. Hernisa Kacorri, who’s combining machine learning and HCC
      • My research goal is to build technologies that address real-world problems by integrating data-driven methods and human-computer interaction. I am interested in investigating human needs and challenges that may benefit from advancements in artificial intelligence. My focus is both in building new models to address these challenges and in designing evaluation methodologies that assess their impact. Typically my research involves application of machine learning and analytics research to benefit people with disabilities, especially assistive technologies that model human communication and behavior such as sign language avatars and independent mobility for the blind.

Phil 3.28.18

7:00 – 5:00 ASRC MKT

    • Aaron found this hyperparameter optimization service: Sigopt
      • Improve ML models 100x faster
      • SigOpt’s API tunes your model’s parameters through state-of-the-art Bayesian optimization.
      • Exponentially faster and more accurate than grid search. Faster, more stable, and easier to use than open source solutions.
      • Extracts additional revenue and performance left on the table by conventional tuning.
    • A Strategy for Ranking Optimization Methods using Multiple Criteria
      • An important component of a suitably automated machine learning process is the automation of the model selection which often contains some optimal selection of hyperparameters. The hyperparameter optimization process is often conducted with a black-box tool, but, because different tools may perform better in different circumstances, automating the machine learning workflow might involve choosing the appropriate optimization method for a given situation. This paper proposes a mechanism for comparing the performance of multiple optimization methods for multiple performance metrics across a range of optimization problems. Using nonparametric statistical tests to convert the metrics recorded for each problem into a partial ranking of optimization methods, results from each problem are then amalgamated through a voting mechanism to generate a final score for each optimization method. Mathematical analysis is provided to motivate decisions within this strategy, and sample results are provided to demonstrate the impact of certain ranking decisions
    • World Models: Can agents learn inside of their own dreams?
      • We explore building generative neural network models of popular reinforcement learning environments[1]. Our world model can be trained quickly in an unsupervised manner to learn a compressed spatial and temporal representation of the environment. By using features extracted from the world model as inputs to an agent, we can train a very compact and simple policy that can solve the required task. We can even train our agent entirely inside of its own hallucinated dream generated by its world model, and transfer this policy back into the actual environment.
    • Tweaked the SingleNeuron spreadsheet
    • This came up again: A new optimizer using particle swarm theory (1995)
      • The optimization of nonlinear functions using particle swarm methodology is described. Implementations of two paradigms are discussed and compared, including a recently developed locally oriented paradigm. Benchmark testing of both paradigms is described, and applications, including neural network training and robot task learning, are proposed. Relationships between particle swarm optimization and both artificial life and evolutionary computation are reviewed.
      • New: Particle swarm optimization for hyper-parameter selection in deep neural networks
    • Working with the CIFAR10 data now. Tradeoff between filters and epochs:
      NB_EPOCH = 10
      NUM_FIRST_FILTERS = int(32/2)
      NUM_MIDDLE_FILTERS = int(64/2)
      OUTPUT_NEURONS = int(512/2)
      Test score: 0.8670728429794311
      Test accuracy: 0.6972
      Elapsed time =  565.9446044602014
      
      NB_EPOCH = 5
      NUM_FIRST_FILTERS = int(32/1)
      NUM_MIDDLE_FILTERS = int(64/1)
      OUTPUT_NEURONS = int(512/1)
      Test score: 0.8821897733688354
      Test accuracy: 0.6849
      Elapsed time =  514.1915690121759
      
      NB_EPOCH = 10
      NUM_FIRST_FILTERS = int(32/1)
      NUM_MIDDLE_FILTERS = int(64/1)
      OUTPUT_NEURONS = int(512/1)
      Test score: 0.7007060846328735
      Test accuracy: 0.765
      Elapsed time =  1017.0974014300725
      
      Augmented imagery
      NB_EPOCH = 10
      NUM_FIRST_FILTERS = int(32/1)
      NUM_MIDDLE_FILTERS = int(64/1)
      OUTPUT_NEURONS = int(512/1)
      Test score: 0.7243581249237061
      Test accuracy: 0.7514
      Elapsed time =  1145.673343808471
      
    • And yet, something is clearly wrong: wrongPNG
    • Maybe try this version? samyzaf.com/ML/cifar10/cifar10.html

 

Phil 3.26.18

But this occasional timidity is characteristic of almost all herding creatures. Though banding together in tens of thousands, the lion-maned buffaloes of the West have fled before a solitary horseman. Witness, too, all human beings, how when herded together in the sheepfold of a theatre’s pit, they will, at the slightest alarm of fire, rush helter-skelter for the outlets, crowding, trampling, jamming, and remorselessly dashing each other to death. Best, therefore, withhold any amazement at the strangely gallied whales before us, for there is no folly of the beasts of the earth which is not infinitely outdone by the madness of men.

—-Moby Dick, The Grand Armada

8:30 – 4:30 ASRC MKT

  • Finished BIC and put the notes on Phlog
  • Exposure to Opposing Views can Increase Political Polarization: Evidence from a Large-Scale Field Experiment on Social Media
    • There is mounting concern that social media sites contribute to political polarization by creating “echo chambers” that insulate people from opposing views about current events. We surveyed a large sample of Democrats and Republicans who visit Twitter at least three times each week about a range of social policy issues. One week later, we randomly assigned respondents to a treatment condition in which they were offered financial incentives to follow a Twitter bot for one month that exposed them to messages produced by elected officials, organizations, and other opinion leaders with opposing political ideologies. Respondents were re-surveyed at the end of the month to measure the effect of this treatment, and at regular intervals throughout the study period to monitor treatment compliance. We find that Republicans who followed a liberal Twitter bot became substantially more conservative post-treatment, and Democrats who followed a conservative Twitter bot became slightly more liberal post-treatment. These findings have important implications for the interdisciplinary literature on political polarization as well as the emerging field of computational social science.
  • More Keras
  • hyperopt is a Python library for optimizing over awkward search spaces with real-valued, discrete, and conditional dimensions.
  • One Hidden Layer:
    training label size =  60000
    test label size =  10000
    60000 train samples
    10000 test samples
    _________________________________________________________________
    Layer (type)                 Output Shape              Param #   
    =================================================================
    dense_1 (Dense)              (None, 128)               100480    
    _________________________________________________________________
    activation_1 (Activation)    (None, 128)               0         
    _________________________________________________________________
    dense_2 (Dense)              (None, 128)               16512     
    _________________________________________________________________
    activation_2 (Activation)    (None, 128)               0         
    _________________________________________________________________
    dense_3 (Dense)              (None, 128)               16512     
    _________________________________________________________________
    activation_3 (Activation)    (None, 128)               0         
    _________________________________________________________________
    dense_4 (Dense)              (None, 10)                1290      
    _________________________________________________________________
    activation_4 (Activation)    (None, 10)                0         
    =================================================================
    Total params: 134,794
    Trainable params: 134,794
    Non-trainable params: 0
  • Two hidden layers:
    training label size =  60000
    test label size =  10000
    60000 train samples
    10000 test samples
    _________________________________________________________________
    Layer (type)                 Output Shape              Param #   
    =================================================================
    dense_1 (Dense)              (None, 128)               100480    
    _________________________________________________________________
    activation_1 (Activation)    (None, 128)               0         
    _________________________________________________________________
    dense_2 (Dense)              (None, 128)               16512     
    _________________________________________________________________
    activation_2 (Activation)    (None, 128)               0         
    _________________________________________________________________
    dense_3 (Dense)              (None, 128)               16512     
    _________________________________________________________________
    activation_3 (Activation)    (None, 128)               0         
    _________________________________________________________________
    dense_4 (Dense)              (None, 10)                1290      
    _________________________________________________________________
    activation_4 (Activation)    (None, 10)                0         
    =================================================================
    Total params: 134,794
    Trainable params: 134,794
    Non-trainable params: 0

Phil 3.23.18

7:00 – 5:00 ASRC MKT

  • Influence of augmented humans in online interactions during voting events
    • Overwhelming empirical evidence has shown that online social dynamics mirrors real-world events. Hence, understanding the mechanisms leading to social contagion in online ecosystems is fundamental for predicting, and even manouvering, human behavior. It has been shown that one of such mechanisms is based on fabricating armies of automated agents that are known as social bots. Using the recent Italian elections as an emblematic case study, here we provide evidence for the existence of a special class of highly influential users, that we name “augmented humans”. They exploit bots for enhancing both their visibility and influence, generating deep information cascades to the same extent of news media and other broadcasters. Augmented humans uniformly infiltrate across the full range of identified clusters of accounts, the latter reflecting political parties and their electoral ranks.
  • Reddit and the Struggle to Detoxify the Internet
    • “Does free speech mean literally anyone can say anything at any time?” Tidwell continued. “Or is it actually more conducive to the free exchange of ideas if we create a platform where women and people of color can say what they want without thousands of people screaming, ‘Fuck you, light yourself on fire, I know where you live’? If your entire answer to that very difficult question is ‘Free speech,’ then, I’m sorry, that tells me that you’re not really paying attention.”
    • This is the difference between discussion and stampede. That seems like it should be statistically detectable.
  • Metabolic Costs of Feeding Predictively Alter the Spatial Distribution of Individuals in Fish Schools
    • We examined individual positioning in groups of swimming fish after feeding
    • Fish that ate most subsequently shifted to more posterior positions within groups
    • Shifts in position were related to the remaining aerobic scope after feeding
    • Feeding-related constraints could affect leadership and group functioning
    • I wonder if this also keeps the hungrier fish at the front, increasing the effectiveness of gradient detections
  • Listening to Invisibilia: The Pattern Problem. There is a section on using machine learning for sociology. Listening to get the author of the ML and Sociology study. Predictions were not accurate. Not published?
  • The Coming Information Totalitarianism in China
    • The real-name system has two purposes. One is the chilling effect, and it works very well on average netizens but not so much on activists. The other and the main purpose is to be able to locate activists and eliminate them from certain information/opinion platforms, in the same way that opinions of dissident intellectuals are completely eradicated from the traditional media.
  • More BIC – Done! Need to assemble notes
    • It is a central component of resolute choice, as presented by McClennen, that (unless new information becomes available) later transient agents recognise the authority of plans made by earlier agents. Being resolute just is recognising that authority (although McClennen’ s arguments for the rationality and psychological feasibility of resoluteness apply only in cases in which the earlier agents’ plans further the common ends of earlier and later agents). This feature of resolute choice is similar to Bacharach’ s analysis of direction, explained in section 5. If the relationship between transient agents is modelled as a sequential game, resolute choice can be thought of as a form of direction, in which the first transient agent plays the role of director; the plan chosen by that agent can be thought of as a message sent by the director to the other agents. To the extent that each later agent is confident that this plan is in the best interests of the continuing person, that confidence derives from the belief that the first agent identified with the person and that she was sufficiently rational and informed to judge which sequence of actions would best serve the person’s objectives. (pg 197)
  • Meeting with celer scientific
  • More TF with Keras. Really good progress