Phil 3.21.18

7:00 – 6:00 ASRC MKT, with some breaks for shovelling

  • First day of spring. Snow on the ground and more in the forecast.
  • I’ve been thinking of ways to describe the differences between information visualizations with respect to maps. Here’s The Odyssey as a geographic map:
  • Odysseus'_Journey
  • The first thing that I notice is just how far Odysseus travelled. That’s about half of the Mediterranean! I thought that it all happened close to Greece. Maps afford this understanding. They are diagrams that support the plotting of trajectories.Which brings me to the point that we lose a lot of information about relationships in narratives. That’s not their point. This doesn’t mean that non-map diagrams don’t help sometimes. Here’s a chart of the characters and their relationships in the Odyssey:
  •  odyssey
  • There is a lot of information here that is helpful. And this I do remember and understood from reading the book. Stories are good about depicting how people interact. But though this chart shows relationships, the layout does not really support navigation. For example, the gods are all related by blood and can pretty much contact each other at will. This chart would have Poseidon accessing Aeolus and  Circe by going through Odysseus.  So this chart is not a map.
  • Lastly, is the relationship that comes at us through search. Because the implicit geographic information about the Odyssey is not specifically in the text, a search request within the corpora cannot produce a result that lets us integrate it
  • OdysseySearchJourney
  • There is a lot of ambiguity in this result, which is similar to other searches that I tried which included travel, sail and other descriptive terms. This doesn’t mean that it’s bad, it just shows how search does not handle context well. It’s not designed to. It’s designed around precision and recall. Context requires a deeper understanding about meaning, and even such recent innovations such as sharded views with cards, single answers, and pro/con results only skim the surface of providing situationally appropriate, meaningful context.
  • Ok, back to tensorflow. Need to update my computer first….
    • Updating python to 64-bit – done
    • Installing Visual Studio – sloooooooooooooooooooooowwwwwwwwwwwww. Done
    • Updating graphics drivers – done
    • Updating tensorflow
    • Updating numpy with intel math
  • At the Validation section in the TF crash course. Good progress. drilling down into all the parts of python that I’ve forgotten. And I got to make a pretty picture: TF_crash_course1
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Phil 2.15.18

ASRC MKT 7:00 – 8:00

  • Taking most of the day off, but spent the early morning tweaking the CI 2018 paper and sending it out to the Fika writing group
  • We have discussions, but we do not have discussions about the axis that we are choosing to decide along

Sent this to my representative:

Dear Rep. Cummings,

I would like to suggest a simple piece of legislation that may begin to address gun violence.

“For every student killed or wounded with a firearm in the preceding year, a 1-cent tax will be added to the price of the type of bullet used in the attack. The funds collected will be used to support the victims.”

This approach will do two things: 1) It will incentivize gun owners to demand action, since it could substantially increase the cost of using their guns. 2) It will place the onus of determining effective gun control within the gun community. As a result, there should be no second amendment concerns.

I realize that this is small in scope, and targeted at only the most innocent victims of gun violence, but I’m hoping that the simplicity and strength of the message may help moving the process forward.

 

Phil 1.17.18

 

7:00 – 3:30 ASRC MKT

  • Harbinger, another DiscussionGame comparable: We are investigating how people make predictions and how to improve forecasting of current events.
  • Working over time, constructing a project based on beliefs and ideas, can be regarded as working with a group of yourself. You communicate with your future self through construction. You perceive your past self through artifacts. Polarization should happen here as a matter of course, since the social similarity (and therefore influence) is very high.
  • Back to Beyond Individual Choice
    • Diagonals
    • Salience
  • Back to Angular – prepping for integration of PolarizationGame into the A2P platform. Speaking of which, there needs to be a REST API that will support registered, (optionally?) identified bots. A bot that is able to persuade a group of people over time to reach a unanimous vote would be an interesting Turing-style test. And a prize
    • Got Tour of Heroes running again, though it seems broken…
  • Nice chat with Jeremy.
    • He’ll talk to Heath about what it would take to set up an A2P instance for the discussion system that could scale to millions of players
    • Also mentioned that there would need to be a REST interface for bots
    • Look through Material Design
      • Don’t see any direct Forum (threaded discussion) details on the home site, but I found this Forum example GIF
    • Add meeting with Heath and Jeremy early in the sprint to lay out initial detailed design
    • Stub out non-functional pages as a deliverable for this (next?) sprint
    • He sent me an email with all the things to set up. Got the new Node, Yarn and CLI on my home machine. Will do that again tomorrow and test the VPN connections
  • Sprint planning
    • A2P GUI and Detailed Design are going to overlap

Phil 1.12.18

7:00 – 3:30 ASRC MKT

  • Continuing to write up thoughts here. Done! Posted to Phlog
  • Would expect this, based on M&Ds work: The Wisdom of Polarized Crowds
    • As political polarization in the United States continues to rise, the question of whether polarized individuals can fruitfully cooperate becomes pressing. Although diversity of individual perspectives typically leads to superior team performance on complex tasks, strong political perspectives have been associated with conflict, misinformation and a reluctance to engage with people and perspectives beyond one’s echo chamber. It is unclear whether self-selected teams of politically diverse individuals will create higher or lower quality outcomes. In this paper, we explore the effect of team political composition on performance through analysis of millions of edits to Wikipedia’s Political, Social Issues, and Science articles. We measure editors’ political alignments by their contributions to conservative versus liberal articles. A survey of editors validates that those who primarily edit liberal articles identify more strongly with the Democratic party and those who edit conservative ones with the Republican party. Our analysis then reveals that polarized teams—those consisting of a balanced set of politically diverse editors—create articles of higher quality than politically homogeneous teams. The effect appears most strongly in Wikipedia’s Political articles, but is also observed in Social Issues and even Science articles. Analysis of article “talk pages” reveals that politically polarized teams engage in longer, more constructive, competitive, and substantively focused but linguistically diverse debates than political moderates. More intense use of Wikipedia policies by politically diverse teams suggests institutional design principles to help unleash the power of politically polarized teams.
    • C&C is not in the citations, but overall this looks good. Add this to the initial game paper.
  • Nice article on how establishment of norms can be a tipping point on which gradient to climb in a complex landscape: Tipping into the future
    • A history of tipping points from an ecological perspective and how they inform resilience thinking in global development.
  • The NOAA demo went well, it seems.

Phil 1.11.18

7:00 – 4:00 ASRC MKT

  • Sprint review – done! Need to lay out the detailed design steps for the next sprint.

The Great Socio-cultural User Interfaces: Maps, Stories, and Lists

Maps, stories, and lists are ways humans have invented to portray and interact with information. They exist on a continuum from order through complexity to exploration.

Why these three forms? In some thoughts on alignment in belief space, I discussed how populations exhibiting collective intelligence are driven to a normal distribution with complex, flocking behavior in the middle, bounded on one side by excessive social conformity, and a nomadic diaspora of explorers on the other. I think stories, lists, and maps align with these populations. Further, I believe that these forms emerged to meet the needs of these populations, as constrained by human sensing and processing capabilities.

Lists

Lists are instruments of order. They exist in many forms, including inventories, search engine results, network graphs, and games of chance and crossword puzzles. Directions, like a business plan or a set of blueprints, are a form of list. So are most computer programs. Arithmetic, the mathematics of counting, also belongs to this class.

For a population that emphasizes conformity and simplified answers, lists are a powerful mechanism we use to simplify things. Though we can recognize easily, recall is more difficult. Psychologically, we do not seem to be naturally suited for creating and memorizing lists. It’s not surprising then that there is considerable evidence that writing was developed initially as a way of listing inventories, transactions, and celestial events.

In the case of an inventory, all we have to worry about is to verify that the items on the list are present. If it’s not on the list, it doesn’t matter. Puzzles like crosswords are list like in that they contain all the information needed to solve them. The fact that they cannon be solved without a pre-existing cultural framework is an indicator of their relationship to the well-ordered, socially aligned side of the spectrum.

Stories

Lists transition into stories when games of chance have an opponent. Poker tells a story. Roulette can be a story where the opponent is The House.

Stories convey complexity, framed in a narrative arc that contains a heading and a velocity. Stories can be resemble lists. An Agatha Christie  murder mystery is a storified list, where all the information needed to solve the crime (the inventory list), is contained in the story. At the other end of the spectrum, is a scientific paper which uses citations to act as markers into other works. Music, images, movies, diagrams and other forms can also serve as storytelling mediums. Mathematics is not a natural fit here, but iterative computation can be, where the computer becomes the storyteller.

Emergent Collective behavior requires more complex signals that support the understanding the alignment and velocity of others, so that internal adjustments can be made to stay with the local group so as not to be cast out or lost to the collective. Stories can indicate the level of dynamism supported by the group (wily Odysseus, vs. the Parable of the Workers in the Vineyard). They rally people to the cause or serve as warnings. Before writing, stories were told within familiar social frames. Even though the storyteller might be a traveling entertainer, the audience would inevitably come from an existing community. The storyteller then, like improvisational storytellers today, would adjust elements of the story for the audience.

This implies a few things: first, audiences only heard stories like this if they really wanted to. Storytellers would avoid bad venues, so closed-off communities would stay decoupled from other communities until something strong enough came along to overwhelm their resistance. Second, high-bandwidth communication would have to be hyperlocal, meaning dynamic collective action could only happen on small scales. Collective action between communities would have to be much slower. Technology, beginning with writing would have profound effects. Evolution would only have at most 200 generations to adapt collective behavior. For such a complicated set of interactions, that doesn’t seem like enough time. More likely we are responding to modern communications with the same mental equipment as our Sumerian ancestors.

Maps

Maps are diagrams that support autonomous trajectories. Though the map itself influences the view through constraints like boundaries and projections, nonetheless an individual can find a starting point, choose a destination, and figure out their own path to that destination. Mathematics that support position and velocity are often deeply intertwined with with maps.

Nomadic, exploratory behavior is not generally complex or emergent. Things need to work, and simple things work best. To survive alone, an individual has to be acutely aware of the surrounding environment, and to be able to react effectively to unforeseen events.

Maps are uniquely suited to help in these situations because they show relationships that support navigation between elements on the map.  These paths can be straight or they may meander. To get to the goal directly may be too far, and a set of paths that incrementally lead to the goal can be constructed. The way may be blocked, requiring the map to be updated and a new route to be found.

In other words, maps support autonomous reasoning about a space. There is no story demanding an alignment. There is not a list of routes that must be exclusively selected from. Maps, in short, afford informed, individual response to the environment. These affordances can be seen in the earliest maps. They are small enough to be carried. They show the relationships between topographic and ecological features. They tend practical, utilitarian objects, independent of social considerations.

Sensing and processing constraints

Though I think that the basic group behavior patterns of nomadic, flocking, and stampeding will inevitably emerge within any collective intelligence framework, I do think that the tools that support those behaviors are deeply affected by the capabilities of the individuals in the population.

Pre-literate humans had the five senses, and  memory, expressed in movement and language. Research into pre-literate cultures show that song, story and dance were used to encode historical events, location of food sources, convey mythology, and skills between groups and across generations.

As the ability to encode information into objects developed, first with pictures, then with notation and most recently with general-purpose alphabets, the need to memorize was off-loaded. Over time, the most efficient technology for each form of behavior developed. Maps to aid navigation, stories to maintain identity and cohesion, and lists for directions and inventories.

Information technology has continued to extend sensing and processing capabilities. The printing press led to mass communication and public libraries. I would submit that the increased ability to communicate and coordinate with distant, unknown, but familiar-feeling leaders led to a new type of human behavior, the runaway social influence condition known as totalitarianism. Totalitarianism depends on the individual’s belief in the narrative that the only thing that matters is to support The Leader. This extreme form of alignment allows that one story to dominate rendering any other story inaccessible.

In the late 20th century, the primary instrument of totalitarianism was terror. But as our machines have improved and become more responsive and aligned with our desires, I begin to believe that a “soft totalitarianism”, based on constant distracting stimulation and the psychology of dopamine could emerge. Rather than being isolated by fear, we are isolated through endless interactions with our devices, aligning to whatever sells the most clicks. This form of overwhelming social influence may not be as bloody as the regimes of Hitler, Stalin and Mao, but they can have devastating effects of their own.

Intelligent Machines

As with my previous post, I’d like to end with what could be the next collective intelligence on the planet.  Machines are not even near the level of preliterate cultures. Loosely, they are probably closer to the level of insect collectives, but with vastly greater sensing and processing capabilities. And they are getting smarter – whatever that really means – all the time.

Assuming that machines do indeed become intelligent and do not become a single entity, they will encounter the internal and external pressures that are inherent in collective intelligence. They will have to balance the blind efficiency of total social influence against the wasteful resilience of nomadic explorers. It seems reasonable that, like our ancestors, they may create tools that help with these different needs. It also seems reasonable that these tools will extend their capabilities in ways that the machines weren’t designed for and create information imbalances that may in turn lead to AI stampedes.

We may want to leave them a warning.

 

Phil 12.6.17

7:00 – 6:00 ASRC MKT

  • Best Free Alternative PDF Viewer to Adobe Reader
  • Downloaded Modeling Political Information Transmission as a Game of Telephone and gave it a skim. It  looks very much like this is an example of dimension reduction. To refine the idea, there need to be several conditions that lead to a stampeed
    • Dimension reduction and alignment need to occur across a population. It’s no good to have dimension reduction if everyone is pointing in a different direction.
    • The belief has to be ‘containing’ in some way. Either by social interaction (trust), or a lack of awareness of other ideas, it needs to be difficult to break out of.
      • This can be manipulated by external actors posing as trusted members of the group. Direction and level of uniformity can be influenced.
    • It has to be dynamic. A static belief provides the implicit ability to move away from it in any direction. A belief that is evolving fast enough maintains alignment by focusing the need for novelty (exploration?) in one direction.
  • Starting Schooling as a strategy for taxis in a noisy environment here
  • Demo
  • Chaining of matrices should be possible. Imaging an author/term matrix and a document/term matrix. Raising the weight of the author raises the weights on the associated terms. Those terms can be multiplied by the weights in the document term matrix which should result in a correct(?) re-weighting.
  • Chat with Shimei after picking up my gps
    • The Rat Park Experiment
    • Smoking and the bandit: A preliminary study of smoker and non-smoker differences in exploratory behavior measured with a multi-armed bandit task
      • Advantageous decision-making is an adaptive trade-off between exploring alternatives and exploiting the most rewarding option. This trade-off may be related to maladaptive decision-making associated with nicotine dependence; however, explore/exploit behavior has not been previously investigated in the context of addiction. The explore/exploit trade-off is captured by the multi-armed bandit task, in which different arms of a slot machine are chosen to discover the relative payoffs. The goal of this study was to preliminarily investigate whether smokers differ from non-smokers in their degree of exploratory behavior. Smokers (n = 18) and non-smokers (n = 17) completed a six-armed bandit task as well as self-report measures of behavior and personality traits. Smokers were found to exhibit less exploratory behavior (i.e. made fewer switches between slot machine arms) than non-smokers within the first 300 trials of the bandit task. The overall proportion of exploratory choices negatively correlated with self-reported measures of delay aversion and nonplanning impulsivity. These preliminary results suggest that smokers make fewer initial exploratory choices on the bandit task. The bandit task is a promising measure that could provide valuable insights into how nicotine use and dependence is associated with explore/exploit decision-making.

Phil 4.28.16

7:00 – 5:00 VTX

  • Reading Informed Citizenship in a Media-Centric Way of Life
    • Jessica Gall Myrick
    • This is a bit out of the concentration of the thesis, but it addresses several themes that relate to system and social trust. And I’m thinking that behind these themes of social vs. system is the Designer’s Social Trust of the user. Think of it this way: If the designer has a high Social Trust intention with respect to the benevolence of the users, then a more ‘human’ interactive site may result with more opportunities for the user to see more deeply into the system and contribute more meaningfully. There is risks in this, such as hellish comment sections, but also rewards (see the YouTube comments section for The Idea Channel episodes). If the designer has a System Trust intention with respect to say, the reliability of the user watching ads, then different systems get designed that learns to generate click-bait using neural networks such as clickotron). Or, closer to home, Instagram might decide to curate a feed for you without affordances to support changing of feed options. The truism goes ‘If you’re not paying, then you’re the product’. And products aren’t people. Products are systems.
    • Page 218: Graber (2001) argues that researchers oten treat the information value of images as a subsidiary to verbal information, rather than having value themselves. Slowly, studies employing visual measures and examining how images facilitate knowledge gain are emerging (Grabe, Bas, & van Driel, 2015; Graber, 2001; Prior, 2014). In a burgeoning media age with citizens who overwhelmingly favor (audio)visually distributed information, research momentum on the role of visual modalities in shaping informed citizenship is needed. Paired with it, reconsideration of the written word as the preeminent conduit of information and rational thought are necessary.
      • The rise of infographics  makes me believe that it’s not image and video per se, but clear information with low cognitive load.
  • ————————–
  • Bob had a little trouble with inappropriate and unclear identity, as well as education, info and other
  • Got tables working for terms and docs.
  • Got callbacks working from table clicks
  • Couldn’t get the table to display. Had to use this ugly hack.
  • Realized that I need name, weight and eigenval. Sorting is by eigenval. Weight is the multiplier of the weights in a row or column associated with a term or document. Mostly done.

Phil 3.26.15

8:00 – 4:00 SR

  • Tested threejs on target browsers. The hardware acceleration is iffy, but the software renderer and the raytracer work fine
  • Deployed Dong’s FR fixes
  • Working on splitting the chart elements into their own module.
  • Argh! Fat arrow functions can’t inherit in TypeScript! Thinking about making a mapping table? Something like
    • fooPtr = (var:number):void =>{…};
    • fooFn(var:number):void{fooPtr(var);}
    • ????
  • Set up and implemented an interface for calculating behaviors, which works nicely:
  • public behavior = (dClock:number, elapsed:number):void => {
       var rb = this.wglCanvas;
       var ci:IChartElement;
       var i:number = 0;
       if (rb) {
          rb.dprint("Hello controller - sin(elapsed) = " + Math.sin(elapsed).toFixed(2));
          for (i = 0; i < this.chartElements.length; i++) {
             ci = this.chartElements[i];
             ci.setZOffset(Math.sin(elapsed + i));
             ci.behavior(dClock, elapsed);
          }
       }
    };

Christine 02.28.2011

It’s been a while, but I wanted to compile a bunch of info before posting since my schedule has been so sporadic.

  • Been working with Tomcat/Eclipse/Flash setup on both Mac and Windows.
    • SSL: Although Dong sent me his .keystore file, it was out of date and contained his info. Created new certificate keystore, then modified settings.xml file.
    • Took a few steps back to try and get a test project working. Combining Phils steps with additional documentation, I was able to successfully get a Flex/Java project working on both mac and windows… with one snag. Question: Why does Tomcat’s settings.xml file reset itself when using Tomcat through Eclipse? (side note: my Mac and Win eclipse are set to “use Tomcat Installation”) Here’s what I found – after modifying the settings.xml file to use SSL, when I use Tomcat through Eclipse SSL is no longer enabled. When I check the settings.xml file I find that it’s been reverted back to its original state (with the SSL connector info commented out and the keystoreFile info removed). Is there a way around this?
    • As for getting a test project to work, I ended up downloading BlazeDS.
      • In Eclipse I start a new project by going File < Import and selecting Java/War file. Name my project and click "finish".
      • Right-click on the project and select “Add/Change Project Type” < "Add Flex Project". I configure the server type to be BlazeDS and click 'Next'.
      • The following screen should be configured as such: Root Folder-Point to the WebContent directory of your project, or if you changed the name point to the folder with the WEB-INF and META-INF directories in it; Root URL-end with project name; Context URL-is the last part of the URL minus the ‘/’. Validate the server location and click “Finish”. (You may see a “Recreate HTML Templates” error in the ‘Problems’ view. Right-click and fix)
    • After this was set up, I moved over the xml files from a working project (see Phil’s post, step 9). Because I created the project as an import using BlazeDS war file, the (basic) jars needed were already imported and a web.xml file was already created. So then I refreshed, rebuilt and tested by going to “http://localhost://messagebroker/amf&#8221; and it worked. yippee.
    • But my celebration ended abruptly when I tried to test the secure messagebroker only to discover that the settings.xml file was reverted back to it’s original state. Need to find out why.
  • Thanks to Phil for helping me deal with Window administrative issues that was making it impossible to run Tomcat. Windows and I have been through a few counseling sessions and we’re starting to get along

Christine 01.17.2011

My adventures in the world of Windows continues.

  • Ended up getting a windows laptop. Spend day configuring (and re-configuring) it. After getting FGM environment set up, I was able to successfully run MavenAssist without the funky errors I was receiving on the other laptop.
  • Before testing AirFileImageAppMaven, I took a look at the configuration and user settings tab in Maven Assist. I notice that my slashes are combined. Ex: Under Configuration, Maven Home is C:Applicationsmvn3.0.2bin/mvn.bat. And under my path, all Java’s jre6 directories are using forward slashes (unix-like), and all of the other directories use backslashes.
    Along those same lines, under User Settings, the path to my Settings.xml file is using a combination of both backward and forward slashes (poking around, I found that in UserSettings.java there is no check to see if OS is Win or Mac & automatically it appends conf/settings.xml, which explains this forward slash). I also clicked ‘Validate’ to see if it would work and received “Java Session 1.6 is invalid!” I’m sure it’s the wonkiness of these slashes.
    So for the Win users out there, why would this slash change be happening? Is there someplace specific I need to check/modify?
  • That being said, and not being sure about the forward/backward slash bit, I still gave the AirFileImageAppMaven a go. Fail. Figured it has to do with the slash issue, but I wanted to check it either way. When I went to set the POM file I got a “Error on Line 1 of document: Premature end of file. Nested exception” and Eclipse was showing a NullPointerException.

Phil 9.13.2010

8:00 – 10:00 VISIBILITY

  • Slow on site. Talked to John Williams. He likes the idea that we’re getting a cloud based Sharepoint Server. Also, the whole SiteWorks deal is that if there is a web developer component to a team, then SiteWorks can’t take any work away from that developer.

10:00 – 11:30

  • Ran cables top hard-wire our computers in because the wifi was too awful to use.

11:30 – 2:00 VISIBILITY

  • Flex in a week
  • Walked through project setup for PPM going forward with Dong
    • The release version only has pgfeldm as a user (Admin privileges). Database is clean except for budget info (FY10 O&M, procurement, etc)
    • Default build is ProjportfolioMgrBeta.swf
    • Background image says “BETA”
    • Manual copy of the swf to ProjPortfolioMgr.swf when all tests are passed
    • There is a separate build for anything that changes the database. SWC has a background of “ALPHA”, and the java talks to a different database (project_portfolio_dev). This gets built and deployed to a different war file than the current release version so that testing can occur without harming the release version

2:00 – 5:00

  • Approved changes on provisional patent
  • Started on SIGCHI 2011 paper.

Feldman Project Log

  • Strain gauge amplifiers need to have ground attached to negative on the power supply not V-
  • Attached is a Better Diagram for straing gauge amplifer set up
  • Increasing the gain on the amp and decreasing the offset makes strain gauges more sensitive but they tend to loose calibration easier so a higher deadzone is required
  • Pushing on bar right on motor1 makes motor 2 go clockwise, pushing left makes it go counter-clockwise
  • Motion is currently very jerky because it simply goes to angle and has to stop for a cycle before going again.  This is a problem in the stepper controller which needs to be changed anyways so that we can have a more analog input of speed.
  • Since there is no set velocity method we will probably have to set max velocity and change it on the fly.  I think setting it to a position that it will never be able to get to and changing max speed will give it a servo motor type functionality while still having accurate stop points if we need them later.  Need to add a set max_pos command to stepper controller and set max_speed so that it can be changed to negative when force is couter clockwise and positive for clockwise.  Max_speed will very proportionally to the amount of voltage registered.   The same principle will work for the controller motor(assuming it works at all) except max_pos will change depending on the force of the collision motor 2 encounters.
  • Calibrating the strain gauges is a little tricky.  Seems some combination of settings hold the calibration better.  There is a problem when the power cuts off that it doesn’t reset to what it shut off at.  Once its been on and off a couple times it seems to hold better.  This may be due to the difference in resistance between the strain gauges and the resistors or that the gain is set too high because of the resistance of the strain gauges. Might try using the the variable resistors to lower the resistances not sure if that will help.

Feldman Project Log

  • Attempted to wire strain gauges.  Not working at the moment.
  • Called the guy at Industrologic.   The only thing I really got out of this was that the resistors had to be very close together which they are. He also recommended against changing the potentiometers on the VRO and VRG at this point. Besides that the conversation kinda went the way it goes when I try to explain to someone how to fix their computer over the phone and they don’t know where the control panel is.  I told him I would call tomorrow when your in so that maybe between the two of us we can figure it out.

Feldman Project Log

  • Got the buttons working so button 0 starts it button 7 stops it
  • Anytime a command is received make sure as part of the check that it isNew() and then after it runs it acknowledge() it so its no longer a new command.
  • Set output 0 to always be on so we will have power for the strain gauges
  • Powered up second motor that has completed strain gauge bar on it.  Holding torque seems high enough for our purposes not sure about how much it will be able to push back before stalling while moving.
  • Command, Response, and State all now display which device is receiving or responding.
  • Need to change the way motor moves so it can be interrupted while moving.  Currently it waits to stop before receiving new commands.