Category Archives: Lit Review

Phil 9.21.17

6:00 – 10:30, 1:00 – 6:00 ASRC MKT

  • I think there is a difference between exploring, a deliberate exposing to things unknown and serendipity, an accidental encounter with the unknown. In the first case, the mind is prepared for the situation. In the second, the mind needs to be receptive to the serendipity. I think that design may matter a lot here. A serendipitous result low on a list may not have the same impact as a point on a map or a line in a story.
  • Oxford English dictionary’’s definitions of:
    • serendipity: “the faculty of making happy and unexpected discoveries by accident”.  
    • explore:  An act of exploring an unfamiliar place; an exploration, an excursion. 
    • discoverTo disclose, reveal, etc., to others or (later) oneself; to find out. 
    • sagacity: Acuteness of mental discernment; aptitude for investigation or discovery; keenness and soundness of judgement in the estimation of persons and conditions, and in the adaptation of means to ends; penetration, shrewdness.
    • synchronicity: the phenomenon of events which coincide in time and appear meaningfully related but have no discoverable causal connection.
  • Skimming these
    • The bohemian bookshelf: supporting serendipitous book discoveries through information visualization
      • A ThudtU HinrichsS Carpendale
      • Serendipity, a trigger of exciting discoveries when we least expect it, is currently being discussed as an often neglected but still important factor in information seeking processes, research, and ideation. In this paper we explore serendipity as an information visualization goal. In particular, we introduce the Bohemian Bookshelf visualization that aims to support serendipitous exploration of digital book collections. The Bohemian Bookshelf consists of five interlinked visualizations, each representing a unique (over)view of the collection. It facilitates serendipitous discoveries by (1) offering multiple access points by providing visualizations of different perspectives on the book collection, (2) enticing curiosity through abstract, metaphorical, and visually distinct representations of the collection, (3) highlighting alternate adjacencies between books, (4) providing multiple pathways for exploring the data collection in a flexible way, (5) supporting immediate previews of books, and (6) enabling a playful approach to information exploration. Our design goals and their exploration through the Bohemian Bookshelf visualization opens up a discussion on how to promote serendipity through information visualization.
      • six design goals that we have derived for promoting serendipitous discoveries through information visualization.
      • Austin coined the term altamirage that describes serendipitous discoveries as a result of chance paired with individual traits of the exploring person [2, 29].
      • This is closely related to the notion of synchronicity where related ideas may manifest as simultaneous occurrences that seem acausal but still meaningful [29].
      • The prevalence of these ideas of chance, fortuity, and coincidence in the discussion around serendipity has led to a tendency to trivialize this complex concept by assuming that serendipity can be supported simply through the introduction of randomness.
      • The design of the Bohemian Bookshelf offers multiple pathways through the book collection by (1) providing multiple interactive overviews of the book collection that can guide the information seeker into different and interesting directions, (2) the presentation of adjacent data that can act as visual signposts providing alternatives for the viewer to move through the dataset by following up on related books, and (3) emphasizing cross visualization attributes by mutual highlighting as in coordinated views [3, 7]
      • multiple pathways through the book collection that can provide guidance in a serendipitous way. The visual overviews can provide one way of exploring books. For instance, visitors can systematically browse through all books of their favourite colour and, in this way, possibly encounter books that are of interest to them but that they did not think of to search for directly. Furthermore, emphasizing adjacent books can be considered as visual signposts. For instance, following up on highlighted books in the Book Pile is likely to rapidly guide people serendipitously to different topical areas of the book collection. As a third approach to multiple pathways, all visualizations of the Bohemian Bookshelf are interlinked with each other. Therefore, every selection of a book in one visualization can be considered a cross road to the other visualizations that highlight this selection as well in their particular context.
      • We deliberately designed the Bohemian Bookshelf to provide multiple overviews of the entire book collection to provide opportunities to discover unexpected trends and relations within the collection.
    • Discovery is never by chance: designing for (un)serendipity – finished. Good paper!
      • P AndréJ TeevanST Dumais
      • Serendipity has a long tradition in the history of science as having played a key role in many significant discoveries. Computer scientists, valuing the role of serendipity in discovery, have attempted to design systems that encourage serendipity. However, that research has focused primarily on only one aspect of serendipity: that of chance encounters. In reality, for serendipity to be valuable chance encounters must be synthesized into insight. In this paper we show, through a formal consideration of serendipity and analysis of how various systems have seized on attributes of interpreting serendipity, that there is a richer space for design to support serendipitous creativity, innovation and discovery than has been tapped to date. We discuss how ideas might be encoded to be shared or discovered by “association-hunting” agents. We propose considering not only the inventor‘s role in perceiving serendipity, but also how that inventor‘s perception may be enhanced to increase the opportunity for serendipity. We explore the role of environment and how we can better enable serendipitous discoveries to find a home more readily and immediately.
        • there is “no discovery of a thing you are looking for
        • However, most systems designed to induce or facilitate serendipity have focused on the first aspect, subtly encouraging chance encounters, while ignoring the second part, making use of those encounters in a productive way.
        • Especially, however, we want to offer approaches to get at
          the desired effect of serendipity: insight
        • For us, serendipity is:
          1. the finding of unexpected information (relevant to the goal or not) while engaged in any information activity,
          2. the making of an intellectual leap of understanding with that information to arrive at an insight
        • In our study, a number of participants remarked that they thought of themselves as ‘serendipitous’, and were surprised to find no instances of it in their search behaviour.
          • This is because exploring is not serendipity. See first point above
        • Click entropy, a direct measure of how varied the result clicks are for the query, was found to be significant. That is, a positive correlation between entropy and the number of potentially serendipitous results suggests that people may have clicked varied results not just because they could not find what they wanted, but because they considered more things interesting, or were more willing to go off at a tangent.
        • Arguably however, almost all visualization systems are designed to support such a goal: identifying interesting, but unknown, trends or patterns in data that would not have been visible otherwise.
        • Erdelez‘s [12] so-called ‘super-encounterers’, encountering unexpected information on a regular basis, even counting on it as an important element in information acquisition.
        • Instead of treating serendipity as arcane, mysterious and accidental, we embrace the ability of computers to help us perceive connections and opportunities in various pieces of information
        • presenting such information to users has the potential to increase the overall information the user must interact with. This can lead to two problems: distraction or overload, and the negative consequences of incorrect or problematic recommendations or assumptions
        • It is widely acknowledged that serendipitous discoveries are preceded by a period of preparation and incubation [7]. They are, in that respect, not as ‗serendipitous‘ as we might expect, being the product of mental preparation as well as of an open and questioning mind
        • The challenge from a design perspective may not necessarily be discovering domain literature opportunities, but defining mechanisms for presenting these suggestions in ways that are effective for the investigator. Further to creating a reading list is defining the space to deliver them opportunistically
        • This idea again supposes a form of common language model, a way to express interest or expertise in particular areas, and a way to search for results.
        • In this spectrum, we have also demonstrated that computer science has spent most of it’s design effort perhaps overly focused on trying to create insight (effect of serendipity), by recreating the cause (chance), rather than on, for instance, increasing the rate and accuracy of proposed candidates for serendipitous insight, or developing domain expertise
  • Ordered this, too: Information Visualization: Beyond the Horizon. Has quite a bit on maps that’s going to be needed in the implications for design section
  • What is a Diagram?
    • This paper responds to renewed interest in the centuries old question of what is a diagram. Existing status of our understanding of diagrams is seen as unsatisfactory and confusing. This paper responds to this by proposing a framework for understanding diagrams based on symbolic and spatial mapping. The framework deals with some complex problems any useful definition of diagrams has to deal with. These problems are the variety of diagrams, meaningful dynamics of diagramming, handling change in diagrams in a well formed way, and all of this in the context of semantically mixed diagrams. A brief description of the framework is given discussing how it addresses the problems.
  • Supporting serendipity: Using ambient intelligence to augment user exploration for data mining and web browsing.
    • Has some very Research-Browser-ish bits in it
    • an agent-based system to support internet browsing. It models the user‘s behaviour to look ahead at linked web pages and their word frequencies, using a Bayesian approach to determine relevance. It then colours links on the page depending on their relevance. In evaluation, the colouring was seen as successful, with people tending to follow the strongly advised links most of the time.
  • Retroactive answering of search queries
    • Major search engines currently use the history of a user’s actions (e.g., queries, clicks) to personalize search results. In this paper, we present a new personalized service, query-specific web recommendations (QSRs), that retroactively answers queries from a user’s history as new results arise. The QSR system addresses two important subproblems with applications beyond the system itself: (1) Automatic identification of queries in a user’s history that represent standing interests and unfulfilled needs. (2) Effective detection of interesting new results to these queries. We develop a variety of heuristics and algorithms to address these problems, and evaluate them through a study of Google history users. Our results strongly motivate the need for automatic detection of standing interests from a user’s history, and identifies the algorithms that are most useful in doing so. Our results also identify the algorithms, some which are counter-intuitive, that are most useful in identifying interesting new results for past queries, allowing us to achieve very high precision over our data set.
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Phil 9.14.17

7:00 – 4:00 ASRC MKT

  • Reducing Dimensionality from Dimensionality Reduction Techniques
    • In this post I will do my best to demystify three dimensionality reduction techniques; PCA, t-SNE and Auto Encoders. My main motivation for doing so is that mostly these methods are treated as black boxes and therefore sometime are misused. Understanding them will give the reader the tools to decide which one to use, when and how.
      I’ll do so by going over the internals of each methods and code from scratch each method (excluding t-SNE) using TensorFlow. Why TensorFlow? Because it’s mostly used for deep learning, lets give it some other challenges 🙂
      Code for this post can be found in this notebook.
    • This seems important to read in preparation for the Normative Mapping effort.
  • Stanford  deep learning tutorial. This is where I got the links to PCA and Auto Encoders, above.
  • Ok, back to writing:
    • The Exploration-Exploitation Dilemma: A Multidisciplinary Framework
    • Got hung up explaining the relationship of the social horizon radius, so I’m going to change it to the exploit radius. Also changed the agent flocks to red and green: GPM
    • There is a bug, too – when I upped the CellAccumulator hypercube size from 10-20. The max row is not getting set

Phil 9.12.17

7:00 – 5:00 ASRC MKT

  • Meeting with Wayne yesterday after Fika. Get him a draft by the end of the week to discuss Monday?
  • More writing
  • Herding in humans (Ramsey M. Raafat, Nick Chater, and Chris Frith)
    • Herding is a form of convergent social behaviour that can be broadly defined as the alignment of the thoughts or behaviours of individuals in a group (herd) through local interaction and without centralized coordination. We suggest that herding has a broad application, from intellectual fashion to mob violence; and that understanding herding is particularly pertinent in an increasingly interconnected world. An integrated approach to herding is proposed, describing two key issues: mechanisms of transmission of thoughts or behaviour between agents, and patterns of connections between agents. We show how bringing together the diverse, often disconnected, theoretical and methodological approaches illuminates the applicability of herding to many domains of cognition and suggest that cognitive neuroscience offers a novel approach to its study.
  • Alignment in social interactions (M.Gallotti, M.T.Fairhurst, C.D.Frith)
    • According to the prevailing paradigm in social-cognitive neuroscience, the mental states of individuals become shared when they adapt to each other in the pursuit of a shared goal. We challenge this view by proposing an alternative approach to the cognitive foundations of social interactions. The central claim of this paper is that social cognition concerns the graded and dynamic process of alignment of individual minds, even in the absence of a shared goal. When individuals reciprocally exchange information about each other’s minds processes of alignment unfold over time and across space, creating a social interaction. Not all cases of joint action involve such reciprocal exchange of information. To understand the nature of social interactions, then, we propose that attention should be focused on the manner in which people align words and thoughts, bodily postures and movements, in order to take one another into account and to make full use of socially relevant information.
  • Herding and escaping responses of juvenile roundfish to square mesh window in a trawl cod end (This is the only case I can find of 3-D stampeding. Note the [required?] dimension reduction)
    • The movements of juvenile roundfish, mainly haddock Melanogrammus aeglefinus and whiting Merlangius merlangus, reacting to a square mesh window in the cod end of a bottom trawl were observed during fishing experiments in the North Sea. Two typical behavioral responses of roundfish are described as the herding response and the escaping response, which were analyzed from video recordings by time sequences of the movement parameters. It was found that most of the actively escaping fish approached the square mesh window at right angles by swimming straight ahead with very little change in direction, while most of the herded fish approached the net at obtuse angles and retreated by sharp turning. The herding and escaping responses showed significant difference when characterized by frequency distributions of swimming speed and angular velocity, and both responses showed large and irregular variations in swimming movement parameters like the panic erratic responses. It is concluded that an escaping or herding response to the square mesh window could be decided by an interaction between the predictable parameters that describe the stimuli of net and angular changes of fish response, such as approaching angle, turning angle and angular velocity.
  • Assessing the Effect of “Disputed” Warnings and Source Salience on Perceptions of Fake News Accuracy
    • What are effective techniques for combating belief in fake news? Tagging fake articles with “Disputed by 3rd party fact-checkers” warnings and making articles’ sources more salient by adding publisher logos are two approaches that have received large-scale rollouts on social media in recent months. Here we assess the effect of these interventions on perceptions of accuracy across seven experiments (total N=7,534). With respect to disputed warnings, we find that tagging articles as disputed did significantly reduce their perceived accuracy relative to a control without tags, but only modestly (d=.20, 3.7 percentage point decrease in headlines judged as accurate). Furthermore, we find a backfire effect – particularly among Trump supporters and those under 26 years of age – whereby untagged fake news stories are seen as more accurate than in the control. We also find a similar spillover effect for real news, whose perceived accuracy is increased by the presence of disputed tags on other headlines. With respect to source salience, we find no evidence that adding a banner with the logo of the headline’s publisher had any impact on accuracy judgments whatsoever. Together, these results suggest that the currently deployed approaches are not nearly enough to effectively undermine belief in fake news, and new (empirically supported) strategies are needed.
  • Some meetings on marketing. Looks like we’re trying to get on this panel. Wrote bioblurbs!
  • More writing. Reasonable progress.

Phil 9.5.17

7:00 – 4:00 ASRC IRAD

  • Read some more Understanding Ignorance. He hasn’t talked about it, but it makes me look at game theory in a different way. GT is about making decisions with incomplete information. Ignorance results in decisions made using no or incorrect information. This is a modellable condition, and should result in observable results. Maybe something about output behaviors not mapping (at all? statistically equal to chance or worse?) to input information.
  • Heat maps!!!! 2017-09-05
  • Playing around with the drawing so we’re working off of a white background. Not sure if it’s better?
  • Adding a decay factor so new patterns don’t get overwhelmed by old ones 0.999 seems to be pretty good.
  • Need to export to excel – Done!2017-09-06
  • Advanced Analytic Status meeting.
  • NOAA meeting. Looks like they want VISIBILITY. Need to write up scenarios from spreadsheet generation to complete integration from allocation to contract to deliverable. With dashboards.
  • Latest version of the heatmaps, This produced the excel sheets above (dbTest_09_06_17-07_01_51) Going to leave it like this while I write the paper: 2017-09-06 (1)

Phil 8.16.17

7:00 – 8:00 Research

  • Added takeaway thoughts to my C&C writeup.
  • Working out how to add capability to the sim for P&RCH paper. My thoughts from vacation:
    • The agents contribution is the heading and speed
    • The UI is what the agent’s can ‘see’
    • The IR is what is available to be seen
    • An additional part might be to add the ability to store data in the space. Then the behavior of the IR (e.g. empty areas) would b more apparent, as would the effects of UI (only certain data is visible, or maybe only nearby data is visible) Data could be a vector field in Hilbert space, and visualized as color.
  • Updated IntelliJ
  • Working out how to to have a voxel space for the agents to move through that can also be drawn. It’s any number of dimensions, but it has to project to 2D. In the case of the agents, I just choose the first two axis. Each agent has an array of statements that are assembled into a belief vector. The space can be an array of beliefs. Are these just constructed so that they fill a space according to a set of rules? Then the xDimensionName and yDimensionName axis would go from (0, 1), which would scale to stage size? IR would still be a matter of comparing the space to the agent’s vector. Hmm.
  • This looks really good from an information horizon perspective: The Role of the Information Environment in Partisan Voting
    • Voters are often highly dependent on partisanship to structure their preferences toward political candidates and policy proposals. What conditions enable partisan cues to “dominate” public opinion? Here I theorize that variation in voters’ reliance on partisanship results, in part, from the opportunities their environment provides to learn about politics. A conjoint experiment and an observational study of voting in congressional elections both support the expectation that more detailed information environments reduce the role of partisanship in candidate choice

9:00 – 5:00 BRI

  • Good lord, the BoA corporate card comes with SIX seperate documents to read.
  • Onward to Chapter Three and Spring database interaction
  • Well that’s pretty clean. I do like the JdbcTemplate behaviors. Not sure I like the way you specify the values passed to the query, but I can’t think of anything better if you have more than one argument:
    @Repository
    public class EmployeeDaoImpl implements EmployeeDao {
        @Autowired
        private DataSource dataSource;
    
        @Autowired
        private JdbcTemplate jdbcTemplate;
    
        private RowMapper<Employee> employeeRowMapper = new RowMapper<Employee>() {
            @Override
            public Employee mapRow(ResultSet rs, int i) throws SQLException {
                Employee employee = new EmployeeImpl();
                employee.setEmployeeAge(rs.getInt("Age"));
                employee.setEmployeeId(rs.getInt("ID"));
                employee.setEmployeeName(rs.getString("FirstName") + " " + rs.getString("LastName"));
                return employee;
            }
        };
    
        @Override
        public Employee getEmployeeById(int id) {
            Employee employee = null;
    
            employee = jdbcTemplate.queryForObject(
                    "select * from Employee where id = ?",
                    new Object[]{id},
                    employeeRowMapper
            );
            return employee;
        }
    
        public List<Employee> getAllEmployees() {
            List<Employee> eList = jdbcTemplate.query(
                    "select * from Employee",
                    employeeRowMapper
            );
            return eList;
        }
    }
  • Here’s the xml to wire the thing up:
    <context:component-scan base-package="org.springframework.chapter3.dao"/>
    <bean id="employeeDao" class="org.springframework.chapter3.dao.EmployeeDaoImpl"/>
    
    <bean id="dataSource"
          class="org.springframework.jdbc.datasource.DriverManagerDataSource">
        <property name="driverClassName" value="${jdbc.driverClassName}" />
        <property name="url" value="${jdbc.url}" />
        <property name="username" value="xxx"/>
        <property name="password" value="yyy"/>
    </bean>
    
    <bean id="jdbcTemplate" class="org.springframework.jdbc.core.JdbcTemplate">
        <property name="dataSource" ref="dataSource" />
    </bean>
    
    <context:property-placeholder location="jdbc.properties" />
  • And here’s the properties. Note that I had to disable SSL:
    jdbc.driverClassName=com.mysql.jdbc.Driver
    jdbc.url=jdbc:mysql://localhost:3306/sandbox?autoReconnect=true&useSSL=false

Phil 7.18.16

7:00 – 3:30 VTX

  • Writing and reworking Lit Review 2. After that, I need to rework the research plan so that RQs and Hs are interchanged.
  • Meeting with Ned Thursday evening?
  • Meeting with Thom second week of August.
  • If there is time today, try to add color change to the table cells to reflect rank. Failing that, add a column that shows relative motion? Both?
    • Added a Rank and Delta field. That seems to be working fine.
  • Finished lockout task
  • Starting Gateway exposes old APIs task

Phil 6.20.16

7:00 – 7:00 VTX

  • Building chair corpus = Current and Cited
  • Filled MostCited.
  • Rating a few more pages. Still not getting any name hits.
  • Going to advanced search and entering items into each field, I get a different looking query:
    https://www.google.ca/search?as_q=New+York&as_epq=Nader+Golian&as_oq=+license+board+practice+patient+physician+order+health+practitioner+medicine+medical
    • These seem to be the important differences
    • as_q=New+York — This is a ‘normal’ query
    • as_epq=Nader+Golian — This must be in the results
    • as_oq=+license+board+practice+patient+physician+order+health+practitioner+medicine+medical — at least one of these must be in the result
  • Going to add a test to look for the name in the query (and the state?) and at least check the NA box and throw up a dialog. Could also list the number of occurrences by default in the notes

1:00 – Patrick’s proposal

  • Framing of problem and researcher
  • Overview of the problem space
    • Ready to Hand
    • Extension of self
  • Assistive technology abandonment
    • Ease of Acquisition
    • Device Performance
    • Cost and Maintenance
    • Stigma
    • Alignment with lifestyles
  • Prior Work
    • Technology Use
    • Methods Overview
      • Formative User Needs
      • Design Focus Groups
      • Design Evaluation and Configuration Interviews
    • Summary of Findings
    • Priorities
      • Maintain form factor
      • Different controls for different regions
      • Familiarity
      • Robustness to environmental changes
    • Potential of the wheelchair
      • Nice diagram. Shows the mapping from a chair to a smartphone
    • Inputs to wheelchair-mounted devices
    • Force sensitive device, new gestures and insights
    • Summary (This looks like research through design. Why no mention?)
      • Prototypes
      • Gestures
      • Demonstration
  • Proposed Work
    • Passive Haptic Rehabilitation
      • Can it be done
      • How effective
      • User perception
      • Study design!!!
    • Physical Activity and Athletic Performance
      • Completed: Accessibility of fitness trackers. (None of this actually tracks to papers in the presentation)
      • Body location and sensing
      • Misperception
        • Semi-structured interviews
        • Low experience / High interest (Lack of system trust!)
    • Chairable Computing for Basketball
      • Research Methods
        • Observations
        • Semi-structured interviews
        • Prototyping
        • Data presentation – how does one decide what they want from what is available?
  • What is the problem – Helena
    • Assistive technologies are not being designed right. We need to improve the design process.
    • That’s too general – give me a citation that says that technology abandonment WRT wheelchair use has high abandonment
    • Patrick responds with a bad design
    • Helena – isn’t the principal user-centered design. How has the HCI community done this before WRT other areas than wheelchairs to interact with computing systems
    • Helena – Embodied interaction is not a new thing, this is just a new area.Why didn’t you group your work. Is the prior analysis not embodied? Is your prior work not aligned with this perspective
  • How were the design principles used o develop an refine the pressure sensors?

More Reading

  • Creating Friction: Infrastructuring Civic Engagement in Everyday Life
    • This is the confirming information bubble of the ‘ten blue links’: Because infrastructures reflect the standardization of practices, the social work they do is also political: “a number of significant political, ethical and social choices have without doubt been folded into its development” ([67]: 233). The further one is removed from the institutions of standardization, the more drastically one experiences the values embedded into infrastructure—a concept Bowker and Star term ‘torque’ [9]. More powerful actors are not as likely to experience torque as their values more often align with those embodied in the infrastructure. Infrastructures of civic engagement that are designed and maintained by those in power, then, tend to reflect the values and biases held by those in power.
  • Meeting with Wayne. My hypothesis and research questions are backwards but otherwise good.

Phil 6.15.16

7:00 – 10:00, 12:00 – 4:00 VTX

  • Got the official word that I should be charging the project for research. Saved the email this time.
  • Continuing to work on the papers list
  • And in the process of looking at Daniele Quercia‘s work, I found Auralist: introducing serendipity into music recommendation which was cited by
    An investigation on the serendipity problem in recommender systems. Which has the following introduction:

    • In the book ‘‘The Filter Bubble: What the Internet Is Hiding from You’’, Eli Pariser argues that Internet is limiting our horizons (Parisier, 2011). He worries that personalized filters, such as Google search or Facebook delivery of news from our friends, create individual universes of information for each of us, in which we are fed only with information we are familiar with and that confirms our beliefs. These filters are opaque, that is to say, we do not know what is being hidden from us, and may be dangerous because they threaten to deprive us from serendipitous encounters that spark creativity, innovation, and the democratic exchange of ideas. Similar observations have been previously made by Gori and Witten (2005) and extensively developed in their book ‘‘Web Dragons, Inside the Myths of Search Engine Technology’’ (Witten, Gori, & Numerico, 2006), where the metaphor of search engines as modern dragons or gatekeepers of a treasure is justified by the fact that ‘‘the immense treasure they guard is society’s repository of knowledge’’ and all of us accept dragons as mediators when having access to that treasure. But most of us do not know how those dragons work, and all of us (probably the search engines’ creators, either) are not able to explain the reason why a specific web page ranked first when we issued a query. This gives rise to the so called bubble of Web visibility, where people who want to promote visibility of a Web site fight against heuristics adopted by most popular search engines, whose details and biases are closely guarded trade secrets.
    • Added both papers to the corpus. Need to read and code. What I’m doing is different in that I want to add a level of interactivity to the serendipity display that looks for user patterns in how they react to the presented serendipity and incorporate that pattern into a trustworthiness evaluation of the web content. I’m also doing it in Journalism, which is a bit different in its constraints. And I’m trying to tie it back to Group Polarization and opinion drift.
  • Also, Raz Schwartx at Facebook: , Editorial Algorithms: Using Social Media to Discover and Report Local News
  • Working on getting all html and pdf files in one matrix
  • Spent the day chasing down a bug where if the string being annotated is too long (I’ve set the  number of wordes to 60), then we skip. THis leads to a divide by zero issue. Fixed now

Phil 6.7.16

6:00 – 10:00, 12:00 – 5:00 Writing

Phil 6.4.16

7:30 – 1:30 Writing

  • More on libraries and serendipity. Found lots, and then went on to look for metions in electronic retrieval. Found Foster’s A Nonlinear Model of Information-Seeking Behavior, which also has some spiffy citations. Going to take a break from writing and actually read this one. Because, I just realized that interdisciplinary researchers are the rough academic equivalent of the explorer pattern.
  • Investigating Information Seeking BehaviorUsing the Concept of Information Horizons
    • Page 3 – To design and develop a new research method we used Sonnenwald’s (1999) framework for human information behavior as a theoretical foundation. This theoretical framework suggests that within a context and situation is an ‘information horizon’ in which we can act. For a particular individual, a variety of information resources may be encompassed within his/her information horizon. They may include social networks, documents, information retrieval tools, and experimentation and observation in the world. Information horizons, and the resources they encompass, are determined socially and individually. In other words, the opinions that one’s peers hold concerning the value of a particular resource will influence one’s own opinions about the value of that resource and, thus, its position within one’s information horizon.